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Osteopathic Medicine: Integrated Masters (MOst)

Course Summary

The (M.Ost) programme is likely to appeal to students with a strong academic interest with perhaps desire to combine lecturing and/or research with work as an osteopath. It may also appeal to students who wish to work in Europe where an Integrated Masters is likely to be the expected qualification for an osteopath. It is recognised by the General Osteopathic Council (GOsC) and on successful completion students are eligible to register as an osteopath with the GOsC.


Applicants to this course will need to meet the following entry criteria (or recognised equivalents).

  • A levels: 112 UCAS Tariff points, including science based subjects
  • BTEC: 112 UCAS Tariff points, in science based subjects
  • Access Diploma: Pass with 60 credits (Science based)
  • An Honours degree (minimum 2:2 classification)
  • A foundation degree in a professionally relevant subject.

Plus: GCSE (A*-C): minimum of five subject including Mathematics and English Language.

We will consider a range of alternative qualifications or experience that is equivalent to the typical offer. Applications from international students with equivalent qualifications are welcome. A minimum IELTS score of 6.5 overall, with no element below 5.5, or equivalent is required for those for whom English is not their first language.

Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) clearance is required.

All applicants must be 18 years or over at the commencement of the course.


Looking to study Osteopathy in the UK?

Nescot has been awarded ‘Sponsor Status’ from the UK Border Agency and is now accepting applications from International Students. International students need a minimum IELTs score of 6.5 to show competence in all four assessed areas.

Most osteopaths are self-employed and work in the private sector, although some are working in multi-disciplinary environments within the NHS and in occupational healthcare in public bodies and private companies.

Fees for 2023/24 Entry

Annual Fees: £9,000

Concession: NO
Government Subsidised: NO
Student Loan Available: YES (Higher education loan may be available)

Full fee information here

Fees are for 2023/24 entry and are for UK students of all ages. For more information about financial support for students, please click here.


Osteopathy students may incur the following additional costs: -

Clinical Tunics and equipment: Stethoscope, Sphygmomanometer (Blood Pressure Cuff), Patella Hammer and ideally an Ophthalmoscope. The approximate costs of these items of equipment is £300 - £500 and they have to be purchased at the start of the year.

The course is designed to equip learners with the knowledge and skills required for professional osteopathic practice and life-long learning. Each cohort has a dedicated group tutor who is responsible for overseeing their teaching and learning experience and who is available for pastoral as well as academic support. Lectures typically run over three days with clinical training delivered onsite during the day and evening. Learners are also expected to complete approximately 20 hrs self-study over the teaching weeks.

Please follow link for programme specification.


Level 4, Year 1 focuses on the acquisition of underpinning knowledge and skills. Key subject areas are introduced including anatomy and physiology, the basic principles of osteopathic practice, the concepts of professionalism and personal and professional development, academic study skills and basic osteopathic manual therapy techniques. Year 1 modules are designed to help learners develop self-reflective and critical thinking skills and to acquire theoretical knowledge of normal human function as well as fundamental manual therapy skills. A blended teaching approach is used with face-to-face lectures supported and enhanced by group work, guided clinical observation and one-to-one tutorials. Teaching is further supported by digital resources available via the Virtual Learning Environment that include lecture presentations and handouts and module related online courses.

Year 1 Modules include:

  • Human Anatomy and Physiology (40 credits)
  • Introduction to Osteopathic Practice (40 credits)
  • Introduction to Academic Skills and Professional Practice (40 credits)


Level 5, Year 2 focuses on the learner’s ability to consolidate upon and develop their knowledge and skills in preparation for their clinical progression from student observer to practitioner. Learners are introduced to pathology and clinical assessment. Their critical thinking and professional practice skills are further developed through engagement and understanding of the research literature and a more reflective and critically evaluative approach to their clinical observation experience. Learners manual therapy, examination and assessment skills progress with the introduction of more complex and intricate techniques and clinical tests. A blended teaching approach continues to be used with face-to-face lectures supported and enhanced by group work, guided clinical observation and one-to-one tutorials. Teaching is further supported by digital resources available via the Virtual Learning Environment that include lecture presentations and handouts and module related online courses. All lecturers are qualified osteopaths and ensure that theory taught is enhanced with their own real life clinically relevant experiences.

Year 2 Modules include:

  • Human Disease and Dysfunction (40 credits)
  • Foundation in Osteopathic Practice (40 credits)
  • Foundation in Evidence Based and Professional Practice (40 credits)


Level 6, Year 3 focuses on the learner’s ability to integrate and synthesise previous learnt knowledge and acquired skills and to apply them in clinic. Learners also further develop the research skills necessary to conduct a project. Their scope of practice and range of osteopathic management approaches is also enhanced as they learn how to manage special populations and also how to best integrate manual therapy techniques with exercise and educational advice. A blended teaching approach continues to be used with face-to-face lectures supported and enhanced with group work, closely supervised clinical practice and one-to-one tutorials. Teaching is further supported by digital resources available via the Virtual Learning Environment that include lecture presentations and handouts and module related online courses. Lecturers continue to use their own clinical experiences to provide context to the theory and also rely more heavily on clinical case studies to facilitate learning.

Year 3 Modules include:

  • Clinical Reasoning and Differential Diagnosis (40 credits)
  • Developing Osteopathic Practice (40 credits)
  • Developing Professional Practice (40 credits)
  • Developing Evidenced Based Practice (40 credits)


Level 7, Year 4 will prepare learners for professional osteopathic practice by developing business skills,clinical reasoning skills, refining technique and widening scope of practice. Additionally learners will be expected to produce a research project and also engage with the research literature to critically evaluate and justify their clinical reasoning and patient management strategies. Students will be expected to demonstrate a high level of autonomy in learning and originality in their application of osteopathic theory to clinical practice. Year 4 prepares learners for life as an osteopathic practitioner, encouraging and developing skills necessary for continuing professional development. A blended teaching approach continues with face-to-face lectures supported and enhanced by group work, supervised clinical practice and one-to-one tutorials. Teaching is further supported by digital resources available via the Virtual Learning Environment that include lecture presentations and handouts and module related online courses. Learners are expected to demonstrate more autonomy and this is reflected in the approach to teaching and clinical supervision where the emphasis is on mentorship and coaching rather than close supervision.

Year 4 Modules include:

  • Clinical Reasoning and Differential Diagnosis (40 credits)
  • Developing Osteopathic Practice (40 credits)
  • Developing Professional Practice (40 credits)

In order to assist teaching and learning there are a number of additional support services available to learners. These include academic skills surgeries run by the learning support centre and subject librarian both face-to-face and online. Training on generic study skills is available on the virtual learning environment and includes advice on writing, oral communication, numeracy and problem-solving among others.

Assessment

The assessment strategies of this course are varied to promote inclusivity and variety. They include formative approaches which provide opportunities for students to gain valuable ongoing feedback on academic, practical and professional ability. Assessments used include written exams, technique, exercise and clinical examination practical assessments, presentations and viva, reflective essays, literature reviews, case study presentations and essays, data interpretation exercises, research project, teaching tasks and clinical based assessment

Learners will be provided with module guides which will provide details of content, learning outcomes and modes of formative and summative assessments. Each individual assessment will have its own assignment brief’ to provide learners with details of the assessment rational, mode, related learning outcomes and guidelines for successful completion.

Clinical Training

A key aspect of the course is the clinical training which occurs in the teaching clinic. Learners begin their clinical training in Year 1 and accumulate a total of a 1000 hours by the end of the course. The teaching clinic is staffed by highly qualified and experienced tutor osteopaths who supervise learners in assessing and treating patients and also who facilitate the learner observation experience. The clinic provides a broad range of experience and learners encounter patients of all ages and lifestyles as well as opportunity to work in specialist clinics such as paediatrics and sports injuries. Learners gain experience in patient management, taking case histories, diagnosis and treatment. They receive a high level of support in the clinic and are allocated a personal clinic tutor and scheduled regular one-to-one tutorial sessions.

Clinical training is also supported by the professional practice modules that run during each year of the course. As part of the assessment of these modules learners are required to submit a ‘Practice Based Learning Record’ which details their clinical experience in terms of critical reflections, clinical audit and action plans.

In Year 1 learners are required to accumulate 56 clinical observation hours. One 2 hour session a week over 28 weeks. Clinic sessions are likely to run on one of the evenings of the three days attended for lectures.

In Year 2 learners are required to accumulate 56 clinical observation hours. One 2 hour session a week over 28 weeks. Clinic sessions are likely to run on one of the evenings of the three days attended for lectures. During the summer learners are also required to complete a further block of 124 hours prior to starting Year 3. During this period they begin to treat patients.

In Year 3 learners are required to accumulate 238 clinical hours. Two 3.5 hour sessions over 34 weeks. Clinic sessions are likely to run daytime and on at least one of the evenings of the three days attended for lectures. During the summer learners are also required to complete a further block of 106 hours prior to starting Year 4.

In Year 4 learners are required to accumulate 420 clinical hours. Three 3.5 hour sessions over 16 weeks and four 3.5 hour sessions over 18 weeks. Clinic sessions are likely to run daytime and on at least one of the evenings of the two days attended for lectures and also on an additional non-teaching day.

Click here to go to our university-level information pages.

Disclaimer:

This Nescot College website describes the facilities and courses which the College intends to offer during the academic year commencing Autumn 2023. The web pages are prepared in advance of the academic year to which they relate and every effort has been made to ensure that the information contained in these pages is helpful, fair and accurate at the time of printing. However, this information is subject to change over time.

Nescot will take reasonable steps to provide the courses and services as described, however, the College cannot guarantee the provision of any course or facility. Some circumstances, such as staff changes, resource limitations and other factors over which the College has no control, such as industrial action or a change in the law or the level of demand for a particular programme or module (please note that this list is non-exhaustive), may result in the College having to withdraw or change aspects of the programmes, modules and/or student services detailed on the website. This could include, but not necessarily be limited to, programme/module content, staffing, the location where the programme/module is taught or the manner of teaching delivery, and the facilities provided to deliver or support the programme. Where circumstances demand an unavoidable change or where it is necessary for the College to discontinue a programme of study, Nescot will take all reasonable steps to minimise the effect and all proposed changes will be notified to potential applicants who have registered an interest in the relevant programme at the earliest possible opportunity as well as being reflected on the College’s website. In addition, any changes between the website and the proposed course and services will be notified to applicants at the time of making an offer.

All prices quoted may be subject to change and you will be notified of any such change when any offer of a place is made to you by Nescot.

Should you become a student of the College, this notice shall be a term of any contract between you and Nescot. Any offer of a place at the College shall be subject to the student enrolment conditions and the College’s rules and regulations as amended from time to time. A copy of the Nescot’s current terms and conditions can be obtained in writing from Nescot, Quality Office, Reigate Road, Ewell, Epsom, Surrey, KT17 3DS.

Last updated - 10/10/22

Overview

  • Course Code:

    N0015

  • Study type:

    Full Time

  • Award:

    Master of Osteopathic Medicine (MOst)

  • Awarded by:

    London South Bank University (LSBU)

  • Course length:

    Four years

    Start Date: September 2023

Apply now Apply now Ask a Question
  • Course Code:

    N0015

  • Study type:

    Full Time

  • Award:

    Master of Osteopathic Medicine (MOst)

  • Awarded by:

    London South Bank University (LSBU)

  • Course length:

    Four years

    Start Date: September 2023

Applicants to this course will need to meet the following entry criteria (or recognised equivalents).

  • A levels: 112 UCAS Tariff points, including science based subjects
  • BTEC: 112 UCAS Tariff points, in science based subjects
  • Access Diploma: Pass with 60 credits (Science based)
  • An Honours degree (minimum 2:2 classification)
  • A foundation degree in a professionally relevant subject.

Plus: GCSE (A*-C): minimum of five subject including Mathematics and English Language.

We will consider a range of alternative qualifications or experience that is equivalent to the typical offer. Applications from international students with equivalent qualifications are welcome. A minimum IELTS score of 6.5 overall, with no element below 5.5, or equivalent is required for those for whom English is not their first language.

Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) clearance is required.

All applicants must be 18 years or over at the commencement of the course.


Looking to study Osteopathy in the UK?

Nescot has been awarded ‘Sponsor Status’ from the UK Border Agency and is now accepting applications from International Students. International students need a minimum IELTs score of 6.5 to show competence in all four assessed areas.

Most osteopaths are self-employed and work in the private sector, although some are working in multi-disciplinary environments within the NHS and in occupational healthcare in public bodies and private companies.

Fees for 2023/24 Entry

Annual Fees: £9,000

Concession: NO
Government Subsidised: NO
Student Loan Available: YES (Higher education loan may be available)

Full fee information here

Fees are for 2023/24 entry and are for UK students of all ages. For more information about financial support for students, please click here.


Osteopathy students may incur the following additional costs: -

Clinical Tunics and equipment: Stethoscope, Sphygmomanometer (Blood Pressure Cuff), Patella Hammer and ideally an Ophthalmoscope. The approximate costs of these items of equipment is £300 - £500 and they have to be purchased at the start of the year.

The course is designed to equip learners with the knowledge and skills required for professional osteopathic practice and life-long learning. Each cohort has a dedicated group tutor who is responsible for overseeing their teaching and learning experience and who is available for pastoral as well as academic support. Lectures typically run over three days with clinical training delivered onsite during the day and evening. Learners are also expected to complete approximately 20 hrs self-study over the teaching weeks.

Please follow link for programme specification.


Level 4, Year 1 focuses on the acquisition of underpinning knowledge and skills. Key subject areas are introduced including anatomy and physiology, the basic principles of osteopathic practice, the concepts of professionalism and personal and professional development, academic study skills and basic osteopathic manual therapy techniques. Year 1 modules are designed to help learners develop self-reflective and critical thinking skills and to acquire theoretical knowledge of normal human function as well as fundamental manual therapy skills. A blended teaching approach is used with face-to-face lectures supported and enhanced by group work, guided clinical observation and one-to-one tutorials. Teaching is further supported by digital resources available via the Virtual Learning Environment that include lecture presentations and handouts and module related online courses.

Year 1 Modules include:

  • Human Anatomy and Physiology (40 credits)
  • Introduction to Osteopathic Practice (40 credits)
  • Introduction to Academic Skills and Professional Practice (40 credits)


Level 5, Year 2 focuses on the learner’s ability to consolidate upon and develop their knowledge and skills in preparation for their clinical progression from student observer to practitioner. Learners are introduced to pathology and clinical assessment. Their critical thinking and professional practice skills are further developed through engagement and understanding of the research literature and a more reflective and critically evaluative approach to their clinical observation experience. Learners manual therapy, examination and assessment skills progress with the introduction of more complex and intricate techniques and clinical tests. A blended teaching approach continues to be used with face-to-face lectures supported and enhanced by group work, guided clinical observation and one-to-one tutorials. Teaching is further supported by digital resources available via the Virtual Learning Environment that include lecture presentations and handouts and module related online courses. All lecturers are qualified osteopaths and ensure that theory taught is enhanced with their own real life clinically relevant experiences.

Year 2 Modules include:

  • Human Disease and Dysfunction (40 credits)
  • Foundation in Osteopathic Practice (40 credits)
  • Foundation in Evidence Based and Professional Practice (40 credits)


Level 6, Year 3 focuses on the learner’s ability to integrate and synthesise previous learnt knowledge and acquired skills and to apply them in clinic. Learners also further develop the research skills necessary to conduct a project. Their scope of practice and range of osteopathic management approaches is also enhanced as they learn how to manage special populations and also how to best integrate manual therapy techniques with exercise and educational advice. A blended teaching approach continues to be used with face-to-face lectures supported and enhanced with group work, closely supervised clinical practice and one-to-one tutorials. Teaching is further supported by digital resources available via the Virtual Learning Environment that include lecture presentations and handouts and module related online courses. Lecturers continue to use their own clinical experiences to provide context to the theory and also rely more heavily on clinical case studies to facilitate learning.

Year 3 Modules include:

  • Clinical Reasoning and Differential Diagnosis (40 credits)
  • Developing Osteopathic Practice (40 credits)
  • Developing Professional Practice (40 credits)
  • Developing Evidenced Based Practice (40 credits)


Level 7, Year 4 will prepare learners for professional osteopathic practice by developing business skills,clinical reasoning skills, refining technique and widening scope of practice. Additionally learners will be expected to produce a research project and also engage with the research literature to critically evaluate and justify their clinical reasoning and patient management strategies. Students will be expected to demonstrate a high level of autonomy in learning and originality in their application of osteopathic theory to clinical practice. Year 4 prepares learners for life as an osteopathic practitioner, encouraging and developing skills necessary for continuing professional development. A blended teaching approach continues with face-to-face lectures supported and enhanced by group work, supervised clinical practice and one-to-one tutorials. Teaching is further supported by digital resources available via the Virtual Learning Environment that include lecture presentations and handouts and module related online courses. Learners are expected to demonstrate more autonomy and this is reflected in the approach to teaching and clinical supervision where the emphasis is on mentorship and coaching rather than close supervision.

Year 4 Modules include:

  • Clinical Reasoning and Differential Diagnosis (40 credits)
  • Developing Osteopathic Practice (40 credits)
  • Developing Professional Practice (40 credits)

In order to assist teaching and learning there are a number of additional support services available to learners. These include academic skills surgeries run by the learning support centre and subject librarian both face-to-face and online. Training on generic study skills is available on the virtual learning environment and includes advice on writing, oral communication, numeracy and problem-solving among others.

Assessment

The assessment strategies of this course are varied to promote inclusivity and variety. They include formative approaches which provide opportunities for students to gain valuable ongoing feedback on academic, practical and professional ability. Assessments used include written exams, technique, exercise and clinical examination practical assessments, presentations and viva, reflective essays, literature reviews, case study presentations and essays, data interpretation exercises, research project, teaching tasks and clinical based assessment

Learners will be provided with module guides which will provide details of content, learning outcomes and modes of formative and summative assessments. Each individual assessment will have its own assignment brief’ to provide learners with details of the assessment rational, mode, related learning outcomes and guidelines for successful completion.

Clinical Training

A key aspect of the course is the clinical training which occurs in the teaching clinic. Learners begin their clinical training in Year 1 and accumulate a total of a 1000 hours by the end of the course. The teaching clinic is staffed by highly qualified and experienced tutor osteopaths who supervise learners in assessing and treating patients and also who facilitate the learner observation experience. The clinic provides a broad range of experience and learners encounter patients of all ages and lifestyles as well as opportunity to work in specialist clinics such as paediatrics and sports injuries. Learners gain experience in patient management, taking case histories, diagnosis and treatment. They receive a high level of support in the clinic and are allocated a personal clinic tutor and scheduled regular one-to-one tutorial sessions.

Clinical training is also supported by the professional practice modules that run during each year of the course. As part of the assessment of these modules learners are required to submit a ‘Practice Based Learning Record’ which details their clinical experience in terms of critical reflections, clinical audit and action plans.

In Year 1 learners are required to accumulate 56 clinical observation hours. One 2 hour session a week over 28 weeks. Clinic sessions are likely to run on one of the evenings of the three days attended for lectures.

In Year 2 learners are required to accumulate 56 clinical observation hours. One 2 hour session a week over 28 weeks. Clinic sessions are likely to run on one of the evenings of the three days attended for lectures. During the summer learners are also required to complete a further block of 124 hours prior to starting Year 3. During this period they begin to treat patients.

In Year 3 learners are required to accumulate 238 clinical hours. Two 3.5 hour sessions over 34 weeks. Clinic sessions are likely to run daytime and on at least one of the evenings of the three days attended for lectures. During the summer learners are also required to complete a further block of 106 hours prior to starting Year 4.

In Year 4 learners are required to accumulate 420 clinical hours. Three 3.5 hour sessions over 16 weeks and four 3.5 hour sessions over 18 weeks. Clinic sessions are likely to run daytime and on at least one of the evenings of the two days attended for lectures and also on an additional non-teaching day.

Click here to go to our university-level information pages.

Disclaimer:

This Nescot College website describes the facilities and courses which the College intends to offer during the academic year commencing Autumn 2023. The web pages are prepared in advance of the academic year to which they relate and every effort has been made to ensure that the information contained in these pages is helpful, fair and accurate at the time of printing. However, this information is subject to change over time.

Nescot will take reasonable steps to provide the courses and services as described, however, the College cannot guarantee the provision of any course or facility. Some circumstances, such as staff changes, resource limitations and other factors over which the College has no control, such as industrial action or a change in the law or the level of demand for a particular programme or module (please note that this list is non-exhaustive), may result in the College having to withdraw or change aspects of the programmes, modules and/or student services detailed on the website. This could include, but not necessarily be limited to, programme/module content, staffing, the location where the programme/module is taught or the manner of teaching delivery, and the facilities provided to deliver or support the programme. Where circumstances demand an unavoidable change or where it is necessary for the College to discontinue a programme of study, Nescot will take all reasonable steps to minimise the effect and all proposed changes will be notified to potential applicants who have registered an interest in the relevant programme at the earliest possible opportunity as well as being reflected on the College’s website. In addition, any changes between the website and the proposed course and services will be notified to applicants at the time of making an offer.

All prices quoted may be subject to change and you will be notified of any such change when any offer of a place is made to you by Nescot.

Should you become a student of the College, this notice shall be a term of any contract between you and Nescot. Any offer of a place at the College shall be subject to the student enrolment conditions and the College’s rules and regulations as amended from time to time. A copy of the Nescot’s current terms and conditions can be obtained in writing from Nescot, Quality Office, Reigate Road, Ewell, Epsom, Surrey, KT17 3DS.

Last updated - 10/10/22

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